News & Announcements

Past news and announcements are shown below. Current news is shown on our homepage.

Adaeze Egwuatu awarded a Millenium Scholars Fellowship

Adaeze Egwuatu, 1st year NSB student working in Jennifer McDermott's lab, was awarded a Millenium Scholars Fellowship through the Society for Research on Child Development (SRCD) for a recent conference meeting in Philadelphia.  The Frances Degen Horowitz Millennium Scholars Program "offers the selected scholars mentorship from advanced graduate students and early career scholars in the field who provide them guidance and support in their pursuit of educational and professional goals."  Congratulations to Adaeze!

Lauri Kurdziel receives the Outstanding Dissertation Award from the SRCD

NSB alum Lauri Kurdziel has received the Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Society for Research on Child Development (SRCD). Lauri is currently working as a postdoctoral researcher in NSB faculty member Rebecca Spencer's lab.  Congratulations to Lauri!

Luke Remage-Healey receives the Endocrine Society Early Investigator Award

NSB faculty member Luke Remage-Healey won the 2015 Endocrine Society Early Investigator Award.  This award is given to early career investigators in recognition of their accomplishments in Endocrine Research.  Recipients receive a monetary award, one-year complimentary membership to the Society, one-year complimentary access to the Society's online journals, and public recognition of research accomplishments in the recipients' home town and various Society mediums.  Congratulations to Luke!

Eric Bittman receives NIH grant

NSB faculty member Eric Bittman just started a new NIH grant (an R21, which provides 2 years of funding) to examine the role of circadian oscillators in brain regions outside the central hypothalamic pacemaker in the control of ovulation. This brings together circadian biology and neuroendocrinology.  Congratulations to Eric.

Agnès Lacreuse receives NIH grant

NSB faculty member Agnès Lacreuse is the recent recipient of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to study sex differences in cognitive and brain aging.  Congratulations to Agnès!

Rosie Cowell elected to the MDRS

NSB faculty member Rosie Cowell was elected to the Memory Disorders Research Society (MDRS) this Spring 2014. MDRS is an invitation only society,
for faculty level researchers. Rosie presented a talk to the society in Austin, TX on September 19th.

Jeffery Blaustein named fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

NSB Professor Jeffrey Blaustein has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for their distinguished efforts to advance science or its application.  According to a press release, Dr. Blaustein was recognized for “distinguished research in behavioral neuroendocrinology, with exceptional contributions toward understanding the cellular processes by which steroid hormones act in neurons, particularly with respect to reproductive behavior.”  Congratulations to Jeff.

 Heather Richardson study suggests teen binge drinking effects may last a lifetime 

NSB faculty member Heather Richardson's study on a study that suggests teen binge drinking effects may last a lifetime has been published in the October 29 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.  According to a recent UMass press release, Heather Richardson and other researchers from UMass (including current NSB student Wanette Vargas) and Louisiana State University examined myelin at the end of the binge-drinking period and found that it was reduced in the prefrontal cortex of the binge drinking adolescent rats. In a separate experiment, they examined myelin several months later after testing for adult drinking behaviors and found that adolescent alcohol drinking caused significant white matter loss and damage to myelin in the prefrontal cortex. 

Mariana Pereira selected for the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation's Research Partners Program

New faculty member in the program (and Psychological and Brain Sciences) Mariana Pereira has received a grant from the Brain and Behavior Foundation.  It is especially exciting that it was selected for the the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation's Research Partners Program

Hu and Albertson study shows a mechanism of how biodiversity arises

In a new study of how biodiversity arises, OEB PhD candidate Yinan Hu and his advisor, Craig Albertson show how a mutation in a single gene during development can lead to different consequences not only in how an animal’s skull and jaw are shaped, but how this leads to different feeding strategies to exploit different ecological niches. The paper is in the current online issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. You can read about their work in a UMass News article.

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