News & Announcements

Past news and announcements are shown below. Current news is shown on our homepage.

Agnès Lacreuse receives NIH grant

NSB faculty member Agnès Lacreuse is the recent recipient of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to study sex differences in cognitive and brain aging.  Congratulations to Agnès!

Rosie Cowell elected to the MDRS

NSB faculty member Rosie Cowell was elected to the Memory Disorders Research Society (MDRS) this Spring 2014. MDRS is an invitation only society,
for faculty level researchers. Rosie presented a talk to the society in Austin, TX on September 19th.

Jeffery Blaustein named fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

NSB Professor Jeffrey Blaustein has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for their distinguished efforts to advance science or its application.  According to a press release, Dr. Blaustein was recognized for “distinguished research in behavioral neuroendocrinology, with exceptional contributions toward understanding the cellular processes by which steroid hormones act in neurons, particularly with respect to reproductive behavior.”  Congratulations to Jeff.

 Heather Richardson study suggests teen binge drinking effects may last a lifetime 

NSB faculty member Heather Richardson's study on a study that suggests teen binge drinking effects may last a lifetime has been published in the October 29 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.  According to a recent UMass press release, Heather Richardson and other researchers from UMass (including current NSB student Wanette Vargas) and Louisiana State University examined myelin at the end of the binge-drinking period and found that it was reduced in the prefrontal cortex of the binge drinking adolescent rats. In a separate experiment, they examined myelin several months later after testing for adult drinking behaviors and found that adolescent alcohol drinking caused significant white matter loss and damage to myelin in the prefrontal cortex. 

Mariana Pereira selected for the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation's Research Partners Program

New faculty member in the program (and Psychological and Brain Sciences) Mariana Pereira has received a grant from the Brain and Behavior Foundation.  It is especially exciting that it was selected for the the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation's Research Partners Program

Hu and Albertson study shows a mechanism of how biodiversity arises

In a new study of how biodiversity arises, OEB PhD candidate Yinan Hu and his advisor, Craig Albertson show how a mutation in a single gene during development can lead to different consequences not only in how an animal’s skull and jaw are shaped, but how this leads to different feeding strategies to exploit different ecological niches. The paper is in the current online issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. You can read about their work in a UMass News article.

Jim Chambers selected for "Young Investigators in Medicinal Chemistry"

NSB faculty member Jim Chambers has been selected to participate in the "Young Investigators in Medicinal Chemistry" at the American Chemical Society meeting in Dallas (March 2014). 

Yi-Ling Lu Wins Best Poster Award

NSB student Yi-Ling Lu won the best poster award at the 2013 Life Sciences Graduate Research Symposium.  Congratulations to Yi-Ling!

Daniel Vahaba and John Hernandez Receive Honorable Mentions

NSB student Daniel Vahaba received honorable mention in his application for an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.  Fellow NSB student John Hernandez also received honorable mention on his application for a Ford Foundation Fellowship.  These fellowships are highly competitive so it is a fantastic achievement.  Congratulations to Dan and John!

Matthew LaClair Recipient of Spring 2014 CRF Research Grant

NSB student Matthew LaClair was awarded a $10,000 pre-dissertation grant from The Center for Research on Families. He will use the CRF grant to complete a project examining how dysfunction within the sex steroid and the dopaminergic systems produce the cognitive and emotional symptoms of schizophrenia.  By better understanding the way these two systems interact, it may be possible to discover novel therapeutic treatments for these symptoms.  His project will be completed in collaboration with his advisor and NSB faculty member, Dr. Agnès Lacreuse.  Congratulations to Matt!

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