About OEB

OEB provides interdepartmental training for MS and PhD students in ecology, animal behavior, organismal biology and evolutionary biology. Graduate students, post-docs, and faculty study biological processes ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem level, often bridging the gap between basic and applied research. Our faculty and students conduct research in four broad areas:

Animal Behavior: Behavioral ecology, communication, learning
Ecology: Community ecology, population ecology, landscape ecology, conservation biology
Evolutionary Biology: Evolution, phylogenetics, population genetics, molecular evolution
Organismal Biology: Physiology, morphology, paleontology

News & Announcements

That's Life [Science] -  interdisciplinary Life Science Blog launching May 1st

That's Life Science staff

An interdisciplinary group of life science graduate students has been working very hard over the last few months to put together a new outreach blog titled That's Life [Science]. Their blog goes live on May 1. To find out more, go to their website:  thatslifesci.com.

Hancock awarded NSF GRF

The National Science Foundation has announced the 2016 recipients of their Graduate Research Fellowships. On the list is 2nd year OEB student Laura Hancock.  Laura was awarded a 3-year, $34,000/year fellowship for her proposal titled "The effects of phenotypic and genotypic variation and growth/fitness tradeoffs on range expansion into a novel habitat for Alliaria petiolata." Fellowships were awarded to 2,000 individuals out of 17,000 applicants. Check here for more information on NSF's GRFP program. Congratulations Laura!

Normark receives Fulbright to study ancient native plants, invasive insect threat

Ben Normark in Gabon

Benjamin Normark, OEB & Biology faculty, was recently selected as a Fulbright scholar and will spend the fall 2016 semester in Mexico documenting the spread of the insect, cycad aulacaspis scale. It is an invasive species that threatens the country's cycads, plants sometimes called "living fossils" because they have changed little in the last 280 million years. Globally, says Normark, "Cycads are under unprecedented assault from armored scale insects and from the global nursery trade that sees cycads as commercially valuable ornamentals." Mexico is home to 55 of the world's 300 cycad species. Most of these are vulnerable or endangered, and many are culturally important, valued for stems that can be pounded into an edible meal, and for their foliage, still used for traditional religious ceremonies.  Read more

Marjadi wins AFS Best Student Presentation Award

Meghna Marjadi (OEB MS student) won the Best Student Presentation Award for her talk, "Evaluating reproductive strategies in alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) using pedigree reconstruction" (co-authored by Adrian Jordaan, Allison Roy, Benjamin Gahagan, and Andrew Whiteley) at the Southern New England Chapter of the American Fisheries Society's Winter Science Meeting on January 14th, 2016 in Groton, Connecticut.

Sarah Goodwin Dissertation Defense

Chipping sparrow

9:00 a.m.
Wednesday, March 23, 2016
209 French Hall
Dissertation Title:  Song perception in communication networks
Advisor:  Jeff Podos