About OEB

OEB provides interdepartmental training for MS and PhD students in ecology, animal behavior, organismal biology and evolutionary biology. Graduate students, post-docs, and faculty study biological processes ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem level, often bridging the gap between basic and applied research. Our faculty and students conduct research in four broad areas:

Animal Behavior: Behavioral ecology, communication, learning
Ecology: Community ecology, population ecology, landscape ecology, conservation biology
Evolutionary Biology: Evolution, phylogenetics, population genetics, molecular evolution
Organismal Biology: Physiology, morphology, paleontology

News & Announcements

Lian Guo is Runner-up in UMass 3-Minute Thesis Competition

OEB graduate student Lian Guo was named the runner-up of the UMass 2019 Three-Minute Thesis. Judges were very complementary of Lian’s speaking skills and ability to talk about her work in an accessible manner.  Lian gave her 3MT presentation on Saturday, March 23rd at 3 P.M. at the Jones Library during the UMass inaugural 3MT Community Day. Watch Lian's presentation here.

Image Created by Chaise Gilbert to be Featured in Prestigious "Images from Science 3" Exhibition

dasyatis_sabina_mcgilbert2019

The work of OEB student Chaise GIlbert will be showcased as part of Images From Science 3, an exhibition organized to showcase the world's best and most compelling images originally made to document, reveal or discover aspects of research, treatment, or scientific discovery. At its core mission, the project seeks to explore the interface of science, technology, art, design, and communication. Science images, unlike most other genres of images, rarely find their way into art museums. This prestigious exhibition is comprised of entries from all around the world and judged by an international panel of doctors, scientists, and imaging experts. Chaise's work will be showcased as part of this exhibition at the RIT’s City Space in downtown Rochester NY. It will then travel to Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore MD, and from there it will go on international tour. Later this year, RIT Press will reproduce the exhibition in print. (Read more)

Two OEB Students Awarded 1st and 2nd Place in the 8th annual Life Sciences Graduate Research Symposium

Alison Fowler won first place and John Swenson won second place for their oral presentations in the 8th annual Life Sciences Graduate Research Symposium on November 30. Alison presented her research on the effects of sunflower pollen on wild bumble bee health and reproduction. John, who is a first year student, presented his Master's research research into the evolution and development of cephalic lobes aka the 'horns' of the devil ray. (Link to associated paper) 

Chaise Gilbert selected as a winner in FASEB's 2018 BioArt competition

OEB student Michael Chaise Gilbert was selected as one of the winners of this year's BioArt competition at the Federation of American Societies For Experimental Biology (FASEB). His "Zebrafish Skeletal Image Showing Bone and Cartilage" image won in the Anatomy category. The image of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) shows the bone (green) and the cartilage (red) that comprises the skeleton. Researchers are using this image, and ones like it, to better identify how a mutation in the primary cilia can affect skeletal development, structure, and morphology.(Read more...)

Ragweed may follow climate change northward

Professor Kristina Stinson

A new predictive model suggests that climate change may allow common ragweed to extend its growing range northward and into major northeast metro areas, worsening conditions for millions of people with hay fever and asthma. 

Plant ecologist Kristina Stinson, Environmental Conservation, who leads a research team that has been studying this plant for over a decade – particularly how it responds to elevated CO2 levels – worked with climate modeler and corresponding author Michael Case at University of Washington on this project. Details appear online in the journal PLOS One, and were also featured in The Daily Hampshire Gazette, as well as University of Washington News. Read more